Speakers

David Autor

  • MIT

David Autor is professor of economics at MIT and a faculty research associate at the National Bureau of Economics. He is also editor-in-chief of the Journal of Economic Perspectives. David is currently engaged in two research programs, one on the growth of labor market intermediation, and the second on job skill demands, technological change, and earnings inequality. He is the recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER award for his research on labor market intermediation, an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship, and the Sherwin Rosen Prize in 2008 for outstanding contributions in the field of Labor Economics. In 2005, he was awarded the MIT Undergraduate Economics Association’s Teaching Award. David was elected a Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists in 2009. He earned his Ph.D. in Public Policy at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government.

Edward Ayers

  • University of Richmond

Edward Ayers is president of the University of Richmond, a position he assumed in 2007. Previously he served as dean of arts and sciences at the University of Virginia, where he began teaching in 1980. Ed was named the National Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in 2003. He has written and edited ten books. The Promise of the New South: Life After Reconstruction was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. In the Presence of Mine Enemies: Civil War in the Heart of America won the Bancroft Prize for distinguished writing in American history and the Beveridge Prize for the best book in English on the history of the Americas since 1492. Ed created The Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War, a web site that has attracted millions of users and won major prizes in the teaching of history. He was appointed by President Clinton to the National Council on the Humanities, on which he served from 2000 to 2004, was a Fulbright professor in the Netherlands, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He presented his work on The Valley of the Shadow at the Forum’s 2003 Aspen Symposium. Ed earned his Ph.D. in American Studies at Yale University.

Andrew Bacevich

  • Boston University and U.S Army, Colonel (Ret.)

Andrew Bacevich is professor of International Relations and History at Boston University, where he is also director of Undergraduate Studies. Before joining the faculty of Boston University, Andrew taught at West Point and Johns Hopkins. He served in the U.S. Army following his graduation from West Point in 1969 until retiring in the early 1990s with the rank of Colonel. Andrew is author of Washington Rules: America’s Path to Permanent War (2010); The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism (2008); and The New American Militarism: How Americans Are Seduced by War (2005), among others.  His essays, reviews and op-eds have appeared in a variety of publications including The Wilson Quarterly, Foreign Affairs, The New Republic, the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, among numerous others. Andrew has held fellowships at the American Academy in Berlin, the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, the John F. Kennedy School of Government, and the Council on Foreign Relations. He earned his Ph.D. in American Diplomatic History from Princeton.

Lawrence Bacow

  • Tufts University

Lawrence Bacow served as the twelfth President of Tufts University from September 2001 through July 2011. During his ten years as President, he advanced the university’s role as a leader in teaching, research, and public service. Within Tufts, he championed academic excellence and placed a premium on open communication and close engagement with students, faculty, staff, and alumni. Nationally, Bacow became well known as an advocate of broader access to higher education and the importance of need-based financial aid. Internationally, he played an important role in efforts to strengthen universities’ commitment to civic engagement. Prior to coming to Tufts, Bacow spent 24 years on the faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he held the Lee and Geraldine Martin Professorship of Environmental Studies and served as elected Chair of the Faculty and subsequently as Chancellor, one of the Institute’s two most senior academic officers. Bacow is currently the Leader-in-Residence at the Center for Public Leadership at Harvard’s Kennedy School. He received his S.B. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, his J.D. from Harvard Law School, and his M.P.P. and Ph.D. from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. A Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he is the recipient of six honorary degrees. Bacow is a member of the Harvard Corporation.

Martin Baily

Martin Baily is a senior fellow in the Economic Studies Program at the Brookings Institution. He is also a senior advisor to McKinsey & Company, assisting the McKinsey Global Institute on projects on globalization and productivity, and an economic advisor to the Congressional Budget Office. Martin first became a senior fellow at Brookings in 1979 and left to serve as a professor of economics at the University of Maryland in 1989. He was chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors during the Clinton administration, from 1999 to 2001. As chairman, he served as economic advisor to the President and was a member of the President’s Cabinet. Martin was also one of three members of the council from 1994 to 1996. He has served as an academic advisor to the Federal Reserve Board and has testified numerous times before Congress. Prior to his return to Brookings in 2007, Martin was a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. His book, Transforming the European Economy, was published by the Peterson Institute in 2004. Martin earned his Ph.D. in economics at MIT.

Ryan Baker

  • Columbia University

Ryan Baker is Associate Professor of Cognitive Studies at Teachers College, Columbia University, and Program Coordinator of TC’s Masters of Learning Analytics. He was previously Assistant Professor of Psychology and the Learning Sciences at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, and served as the first technical director of the Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center DataShop, the largest public repository for data on the interaction between learners and educational software. Ryan is currently serving as the founding president of the International Educational Data Mining Society, and as associate editor of the Journal of Educational Data Mining. His research combines educational data mining and quantitative field observation methods to better understand how students respond to educational software, and how these responses impact their learning. Ryan earned his Ph.D. in Human-Computer Interaction from Carnegie Mellon University.

Deborah Loewenberg Ball

  • University of Michigan

Deborah Loewenberg Ball is William H. Payne Collegiate Professor in education at the University of Michigan, and an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor. She currently serves as dean of the School of Education and director of TeachingWorks. She taught elementary school for over 15 years, and continues to teach mathematics to elementary students every summer. Her areas of research are mathematical knowledge for teaching, the practice of teaching, and approaches to training for and improvement of teaching. Deborah has authored or co-authored more than 150 publications and has lectured and given presentations around the world. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Mathematics Society, and the American Educational Research Association, and an elected member of the National Academy of Education. Deborah serves on the National Science Board and the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute Board of Trustees, and chairs the Spencer Foundation Board of Directors. She earned her Ph.D. in curriculum and education policy from Michigan State.

Sandy Baum

  • Urban Institute

Sandy Baum is a Senior Fellow at the Urban Institute and Professor Emerita of Economics at Skidmore College. She has written and spoken extensively on issues relating to college access, college pricing, student aid policy, student debt, affordability, and other aspects of higher education finance. Baum has co-authored the College Board’s annual publications Trends in Student Aid and Trends in College Pricing since 2002. She also co-authors Education Pays: The Benefits of Higher Education for Individuals and Society. She chaired the College Board’s Rethinking Student Aid study group, which issued comprehensive proposals for reform of the federal student aid system in 2008, and the Rethinking Pell Grants study group, which issued recommendations in April 2013. Baum chaired a Brookings Institution study group that issued its report, Beyond Need and Merit: Strengthening State Grant Programs in May 2012. Her recent work includes studies of how behavioral economics can inform student aid policy; a meaningful definition of college affordability; tuition and financial aid strategies for broad access public institutions; and the NSF-funded Educational Attainment: Understanding the Data. Her book, Student Debt: Rhetoric and Realities of Higher Education Financing, will come out in summer 2016. Baum is a member of the Board of the National Student Clearinghouse. She earned her B.A. in sociology at Bryn Mawr College, where she is currently a member of the Board of Trustees, and her Ph.D. in economics at Columbia University.

Sandy Baum

  • The College Board

Sandy Baum is professor of economics at Skidmore College and Senior Policy Analyst at the College Board. She has written extensively on issues relating to college access, college pricing, student aid policy, student debt, affordability, and other aspects of higher education finance, and is the co-author of Trends in Student Aid, Trends in College Pricing and Education Pays: The Benefits of Higher Education for Individuals and Society for the College Board. Other recent work includes studies of setting benchmarks for manageable student debt levels and of tuition discounting in public and private colleges and universities. Sandy co-chaired, with Michael McPherson, the Rethinking Student Aid study group, a foundation-funded effort under the auspices of the College Board that released proposals for reforming the federal student aid system in 2008. Sandy presented “Student Financial Aid Policies: Do They Promote Universal Education,” at the Forum’s 2003 Aspen Symposium. Sandy earned her Ph.D. in economics at Columbia University.

Sandy Baum

  • Urban Institute

Sandy Baum is a nonresident fellow at the Urban Institute and professor emerita of economics at Skidmore College. Baum earned her B.A. in sociology at Bryn Mawr College, where she is currently a member of the Board of Trustees, and her Ph.D. in economics at Columbia University. She has written and spoken extensively on issues relating to college access, college pricing, student aid policy, student debt, affordability, and other aspects of higher education finance. Baum has co-authored the College Board’s annual publications Trends in Student Aidand Trends in College Pricing since 2002. Through the College Board and the Brookings Institution, she has chaired major study groups that released proposals for reforming federal and state student aid. Shehas published numerous articles on higher education finance in professional journals, books, and the trade press. She is the principle researcher on the Urban Institute’s website on college affordability and her recent work includes Urban Institute briefs on graduate student enrollments and financing and studies of college endowments and state grant programs. She is the author of Student Debt: Rhetoric and Realities of Higher Education Financing (Palgrave Macmillan 2016) and co-author with Harry Holzer of Making College Work: Pathways to Success for Disadvantaged Students (Brookings Institution Press 2017). She is a member of the Board of the National Student Clearinghouse.